Thursday, September 30, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 392

Title: Others having broken the stems of their pipes almost short off at the bowl, were vigorously puffing tobacco-smoke, so that it constantly filled their olfactories.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 29, 2010

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 391

Title: Drawing across her bow, he perceived that in accordance with the fanciful French taste, the upper part of her stem-piece was carved in the likeness of a huge drooping stalk, was painted green, and for thorns had copper spikes projecting from it here and there; the whole terminating in a symmetrical folded bulb of a bright red color.

8 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
September 28, 2010

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 390

Title: Coming still nearer with the expiring breeze, we saw that the Frenchman had a second whale alongside; and this second whale seemed even more of a nosegay than the first. In truth, it turned out to be one of those problematical whales that seem to dry up and die with a sort of prodigious dyspepsia, or indigestion; leaving their defunct bodies almost entirely bankrupt of anything like oil.

5.25 inches by 6.5 inches
ink on found paper
September 27, 2010

Monday, September 27, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 389

Title: Presently, the vapors in advance slid aside; and there in the distance lay a ship, whose furled sails betokened that some sort of whale must be alongside. As we glided nearer, the stranger showed French colors from his peak; and by the eddying cloud of vulture sea-fowl that circled, and hovered, and swooped around him, it was plain that the whale alongside must be what the fishermen call a blasted whale, that is, a whale that has died unmolested on the sea, and so floated an unappropriated corpse.

10.75 inches by 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
September 27, 2010

Sunday, September 26, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 086 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: "Cap'ain, you see him small drop tar on water dere? You see him? well, spose him one whale eye, well, den!" and taking sharp aim at it, he darted the iron right over old Bildad's broad brim, clean across the ship's decks, and struck the glistening tar spot out of sight.

9.25 inches by 6 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 26, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 052 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: Nothing exists in itself.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink on found paper
September 24, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 049 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: I'll try a pagan friend...since Christian kindness has proved but hollow courtesy.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink on found paper
September 24, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 033 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: Each silent worshipper seemed purposely sitting apart from the other, as if each silent grief were insular and incommunicable.

6 inches by 9.25 inches
acrylic paint, collage and ink on found paper
September 20, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 028 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: However, a good laugh is a mighty good thing, and rather too scarce a good thing...

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink on found paper
September 21, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 024 (re-drawn)

(For various reasons, a handful of these illustrations needed to be redrawn. These are the new versions.)

Title: Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink on found paper
September 21, 2010


(Original version below)

MOBY-DICK, Page 388

Title: But is the Queen a mermaid, to be presented with a tail? An allegorical meaning may lurk here.

9 inches by 12 inches
collage on construction paper and chipboard
September 26, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 387

Title: "Please, Sir, who is the Lord Warden?"

"The Duke."

"But the duke had nothing to do with taking this fish?"

"It is his."

"We have been at great trouble, and peril, and some expense, and is all that to go to the Duke's benefit; we getting nothing at all for our pains but our blisters?"

"It is his."

"Is the Duke so very poor as to be forced to this desperate mode of getting a livelihood?"

"It is his."

"I thought to relieve my old bed-ridden mother by part of my share of this whale."

"It is his."

"Won't the Duke be content with a quarter or a half?"

"It is his."


6 inches by 8.5 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 25, 2010

Saturday, September 25, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 386

Title: "De balena vero sufficit, si rex habeat caput, et regina caudam."

Bracton, l 3. c. 3.

Latin from the books of the Laws of England, which taken along with the context, means, that of all whales captured by anybody on the coast of that land, the King, as Honorary Grand Harpooneer, must have the head, and the Queen be respectfully presented with the tail. A division which, in the whale, is much like halving an apple; there is no intermediate remainder.


12 inches by 7 inches
acrylic paint, collage and ink on construction paper
September 24, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 385

Title: What all men's minds and opinions but Loose-Fish?

8.25 inches by 12 inches
ink and watercolor on watercolor paper
September 24, 2010

Thursday, September 23, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 384

Title: ...though the gentleman had originally harpooned the lady, and had once had her fast, and only by reason of the great stress of her plunging viciousness, had as last abandoned her; yet abandon her he did, so that she became a loose-fish...

8 inches by 11 inches
collage on wallpaper sample and chipboard
September 23, 2010

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 383

Title: I. A Fast-Fish belongs to the party fast to it.

II. A Loose-Fish is fair game for anybody who can soonest catch it.


8.5 inches by 7 inches
acrylic paint, collage and ink on found paper
September 21, 2010

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 382

Title: Thus the most vexatious and violent disputes would often arise between the fishermen...

9.25 inches by 6 inches
collage and ink on found paper
September 20, 2010

Monday, September 20, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 381

Title: Almost universally, a lone whale - as a solitary Leviathan is called - proves an ancient one.

8.5 inches by 7 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on Bristol board
September 19, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 380

Title: ...he leaves his anonymous babies all over the world; every baby an exotic.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 18, 2010

Saturday, September 18, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 379

Title: In cavalier attendance upon the school of females, you invariably see a male of full grown magnitude, but not old; who, upon any alarm, evinces his gallantry by falling in the rear and covering the flight of his ladies. In truth, this gentleman is a luxurious Ottoman, swimming about over the watery world...

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 17, 2010

Friday, September 17, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 378

Title: The waif is a pennoned pole, two or three of which are carried by every boat; and which, when additional game is at hand, are inserted upright into the floating body of a dead whale, both to mark its place on the sea, and also as token of prior possession, should the boats of any other ship draw near.

7.25 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and pencil on found paper
September 16, 2010

Thursday, September 16, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 377

Title: But at length we perceived that by one of the unimaginable accidents of the fishery, this whale had become entangled in the harpoon-line that he towed; he had also run away with the cutting-spade in him; and while the free end of the rope attached to that weapon, had permanently caught in the coils of the harpoon-line round his tail, the cutting-spade itself had worked loose from his flesh. So that tormented to madness, he was now churning through the water, violently flailing with his flexible tail, and tossing the keen spade about him, wounding and murdering his own comrades.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 15, 2010

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 376

Title: As when the stricken whale, that from the tub has reeled out hundreds of fathoms of rope; as, after deep sounding, he floats up again, and shows the slackened curling line buoyantly rising and spiralling towards the air; so now, Starbuck saw long coils of the umbilical cord of Madame Leviathan, by which the young cub seemed still tethered to its dam.

5.25 inches by 8 inches
colored pencil on found paper
September 15, 2010

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 375

Title: But far beneath this wondrous world upon the surface, another and still stranger world met our eyes as we gazed over the side. For, suspended in those watery vaults, floated the forms of the nursing mothers of the whales, and those that by their enormous girth seemed shortly to become mothers.

8.25 inches by 12 inches
ink and marker on watercolor paper
September 14, 2010

Monday, September 13, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 374

Title: ...then, with the tapering force of his parting momentum, we glided between two whales into the innermost heart of the shoal...

8 inches by 7 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 13, 2010

Sunday, September 12, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 373

Title: ...as we thus tore a white gash in the sea, on all sides menaced as we flew, by the crazed creatures to and fro rushing about us...

8 inches by 7 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 12, 2010

Saturday, September 11, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 372

Title: The compact martial columns in which they had been hitherto rapidly and steadily swimming, were now broken up in one measureless rout; and like King Porus' elephants in the Indian battle with Alexander, they seemed going mad with consternation. In all directions expanding in vast irregular circles, and aimlessly swimming hither and thither, by their short thick spoutings, they plainly betrayed their distraction of panic.

7 inches by 10.25 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 9, 2010

Friday, September 10, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 371

Title: ...when all these conceits had passed through his brain, Ahab's brow was left gaunt and ribbed, like the black sand beach after some stormy tide has been gnawing it, without being able to drag the firm thing from its place.

5 inches by 6.5 inches
colored pencil and ink on found paper
September 8, 2010

Thursday, September 9, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 370

Title: ...a continuous chain of whale-jets were up-playing and sparkling in the noon-day air.

8 inches by 7 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 7, 2010

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 369

Title: Hence it is, that, while other ships may have gone to China from New York, and back again, touching at a score of ports, the whale-ship, in all that interval, may not have sighted one grain of soil; her crew having seen no man but floating seamen like themselves. So that did you carry them the news that another flood had come; they would only answer—"Well, boys, here's the ark!"

15.5 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 6, 2010

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 368

Title: For a long time, now, the circus-running sun has raced within his fiery ring, and needs no sustenance but what's in himself. So Ahab. Mark this, too, in the whaler.

9 inches by 12 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
September 5, 2010

Monday, September 6, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 367

Title: Dissect him how I may, then, I but go skin deep; I know him not, and never will. But if I know not even the tail of this whale, how understand his head? much more, how comprehend his face, when face he has none? Thou shalt see my back parts, my tail, he seems to say, but my face shall not be seen. But I cannot completely make out his back parts; and hint what he will about his face, I say again he has no face.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and charcoal on found paper
September 5, 2010

Sunday, September 5, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 366

Title: Standing at the mast-head of my ship during a sunrise that crimsoned sky and sea, I once saw a large herd of whales in the east, all heading towards the sun, and for a moment vibrating in concert with peaked flukes. As it seemed to me at the time, such a grand embodiment of adoration of the gods was never beheld...

8.75 inches by 8.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 4, 2010

Saturday, September 4, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 365

Title: So in dreams, have I seen majestic Satan thrusting forth his tormented colossal claw from the flame Baltic of Hell.

6 inches by 9 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 3, 2010

Friday, September 3, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 364

Title: Five great motions are peculiar to it. First, when used as a fin for progression; Second, when used as a mace in battle; Third, in sweeping; Fourth, in lobtailing; Fifth, in peaking flukes.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
marker on found paper
September 1, 2010

Thursday, September 2, 2010

MOBY-DICK, Page 363

Title: At the crotch or junction, these flukes slightly overlap, then sideways recede from each other like wings, leaving a wide vacancy between. In no living thing are the lines of beauty more exquisitely defined than in the crescentic borders of these flukes.

7.75 inches by 10.75 inches
ink on found paper
September 1, 2010

Wednesday, September 1, 2010